Trade Agreement Between Canada And Turkey

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Trade Agreement Between Canada And Turkey

“The protectionism policy is hurting the multilateral trading system and the world`s supply chains. That is why bilateral cooperation initiatives have become more important,” Batur added. After Germany and Russia, Turkey is the 17th largest economy in the world and the third most populous nation in Europe (about 79.8 million). Due to its strategic geographical position and trade agreements with other countries, Turkey offers opportunities for access to other markets in the region, both through a partnership with Turkish companies based in these other markets and through their position as a regional hub. Turkey has a strong economic base, a young entrepreneurial spirit and a dynamic market. Its economy is supported by a strong and well-rounded financial system, with rich agricultural and mineral resources, a robust manufacturing industry and a strong services sector. While its lack of oil carries economic risks, Turkey`s geographical location has created a historic bridge between continents for transport and trade. In recent years, there has been a series of high-level visits between Turkey and Canada. Former House of Commons spokesman Andrew Scheer visited Turkey in 2014 and the spokesman for the Turkish Grand National Assembly led a parliamentary delegation to Canada in February 2015. Recently, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visited Turkey for the 2015 G20 summit in Antalya and met with both Turkish President Recep Erdogan and former Prime Minister Ahmet Davutolu. At the DECEMBER 2015 NATO Foreign Ministers` meeting, former Canadian Foreign Minister Stéphane Dion met with his Turkish counterpart Mevlet Avuéolu. Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland met with Minister Avusolu at the G20 foreign ministers` meeting in February 2017, at the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly in September 2017 and January 2018 in Vancouver. In January 2018, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Omar Alghabra, visited Turkey and met, among others, with the Deputy Minister of Justice, the Director General of Consular Affairs at the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Chief Ombudsman of the Turkish Parliament.

In January 2019, Ian Shugart, then Canada`s Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, visited Turkey for political consultations. In May 2019, Canadian Senate spokesman George Furey visited Turkey, including a meeting with President Erdogan, the President of the Turkish Grand National Assembly and the Turkish Minister of Culture and Tourism. There have been many high-level visits between the leaders of the two nations. In June 2010, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan travelled to Canada to attend the G20 summit in Toronto. In November 2015, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau travelled to Turkey to attend the G20 summit in Antalya. [7] Relations between Canada and Turkey have generally been good since the two countries began diplomatic relations in the 1940s. But there are stumbling blocks, including the Canadian government`s recognition of the Armenian genocide in 2004. As the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs` website on Turkey-Canada relations currently states, “the position of the Canadian government and the resolutions adopted by both houses of the Canadian Parliament on the events of 1915 do not correspond to historical facts and create difficulties in relations between Turkey and Canada.” Yet since 2004, many other governments have adopted resolutions recognizing the Armenian genocide, somewhat watering down Ankara`s sharp frustration with Ottawa.