Rome Berlin Agreement

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Rome Berlin Agreement

The Rome-Berlin axis was further formalized in April 1939 with the creation of another pact in which Mussolini, the great phrase-maker, marked the Steel Pact after rejecting the Blood Pact. Although the establishment of this agreement was supposed to establish a higher degree of intimacy between the two nations, the pact was fundamentally flawed and would lead to Italy`s non-war when war broke out in September 1939. After his assassination, De Gaulle emerged as an undisputed French leader. The CFLN set up more troops and organized, trained and re-equipped the Free French Army, in collaboration with allied forces, in preparation for future operations against Italy and the German Atlantic Wall. Some countries have worked with Germany, Italy and Japan without signing the anti-break pact or the tripartite pact. In some cases, these bilateral agreements have been formalized, in others they have been less formal. Some of these countries were puppet states created by the Axis powers themselves. This document will analyze the years 1936-1940 and will be divided into five sections with a chronological structure. 1936-37 Examination of the effects of the Abessian crisis, the remilitarization of the Rhineland and the Spanish Civil War, followed by 1938, which takes into account the effects of the annexation, the Munich Agreement and the Anglo-Italian agreement that followed in 1939 with the creation of the steel pact and the conduct of Italy`s non-war. . . .